Pork Stock (Nuoc Leo)

Simple and delicious Pork Stock recipeAromatic and flavorful Pork Stock can be made easily at home with this recipe. Having a clear golden liquid and rich full-bodied flavor are crucial success factors when making homemade stock. In addition to using good, fresh ingredients, the keys to a beautiful and tasty Pork Stock are the preparation and cooking methods. In this easy recipe, I share my tried-and-true method for making homemade Pork Stock. This recipe makes amazing stock every single time. Just one taste of this clean and healthy Pork Stock and you’ll want to make it from scratch every time!

Notes on the Recipe, Tips and Tricks

Either fresh or frozen pork bones can be used for this recipe. Make sure the bones are completely thawed before using. At my local Asian grocer, pork bones are sold at the meat counter and I can purchase any quantity needed. Some stores will pre-package the bones and sell them with other refrigerated pork products while others stock them in the freezer section.

Salt and vinegar are awesome natural cleaning agents. Salt is a natural abrasive and soap, washing away greasiness. Vinegar is a really effective deodorizer. I use these two ingredients to clean all my meats and fish.

I am using an 8 quart pot which is just large enough to hold everything. If you’d like to make more stock, use a larger pot perhaps a 10 or 12 quart pot.

Dried squid can be found at your local Asian grocery store. It’s usually stocked in the refrigerated section.

The squid adds a unique combination of savory and sweetness to the stock. I don’t use any more than one-third of a squid body. Too much squid can overpower the stock. This is why I add it at the simmering halfway point rather than at the beginning. If you can smell the squid in the stock, there’s too much of it.

Do not cover the pot completely when simmering the stock. This will cause the stock to be cloudy.

The pork stock yield may vary depending on the bones used. Note the bones I used had a significant amount of meat on them. This meat absorbs a lot of liquid in addition to some evaporating during the simmer process. If needing a greater yield, add more water. Also, when removing the bones, shake off each piece to leave behind as much stock as possible.

You may have noticed I didn’t add fish sauce to the base stock. I save this additional seasoning for the final dish. Most of the time the stock is used to make other dishes and that’s when I add fish sauce. Also, I’ve found stock with fish sauce turns slightly sour after refrigerating or freezing.

Watch the video for instructions.


If you enjoy this recipe, you may also like: Chicken Stock (Nuoc Sup Ga, Nuoc Leo) and Preparing Banana Leaves.

Ingredients

2 inch knob ginger
1 medium sweet onion
5 lbs pork bones
1/4 cup salt, divided
2 Tbsp white vinegar
20 cups water
1.5 oz rock sugar
20 black peppercorns
1/3 dried squid

Directions

Remove the skin from the ginger and discard. Using a pestle, smash the ginger slightly.

Peel the onion skin and discard. Quarter the onion but don’t cut it all the way through.

Transfer half the pork bones into a large colander and then sprinkle with 1 Tbsp salt. Add the remaining bones and sprinkle with another 1 Tbsp salt.

Gently rub the salt onto the bones. Under cold running water, wash each bone thoroughly. Run your fingers along each piece and wash away any loose bits. Transfer the washed bones into a large bowl. Sprinkle another 1 Tbsp salt and add the vinegar to the bones. Fill the bowl with cold water. Let the bones soak for 10 minutes. Pour out the soaking liquid and transfer the bones into the colander. Quickly rinse the bones with water again.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil over High heat. Transfer all the bones into the pot. As the water comes to a boil again, skim off the foam and scum and discard. Rotate the bones. (This helps to move the scum to the surface.) Continue skimming away the impurities. Boil for a total of 5 minutes, alternating the stirring with the skimming.

Pour off as much of the liquid as possible. Transfer the bones into the colander. Under cold running water, wash each bone thoroughly. Scrub with your fingers and remove any bits of marrow.

In a large pot, add the 20 cups water. Cover with a lid and bring to a boil over High heat. Transfer the cleaned bones into the water. Add the onion, ginger, rock sugar, peppercorns and remaining 1 Tbsp salt. As the liquid comes to a boil, rotate the bones and skim off any scum. Reduce the heat to Low. Partially cover the pot with a lid. Simmer for 30 minutes. Stir the bones and skim the top again. Let simmer for another 30 minutes.

Cut off a small section of the squid body. Wash with warm water and then shake off the excess water. Place into a small oven and bake at 350 F (177 C) for 8 minutes. Add the squid into the pot. Wedge it under one of the bones to keep it submerged in the stock. Continue cooking on Low heat for another hour.

Skim the stock one more time. Remove the vegetables, squid and all the bones. Season the stock with more salt if needed.

Strain the stock using a fine strainer or sieve.

If not using right away, store in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. Freeze for up to 6 months.

Enjoy the Pork Stock as a simple soup or as a base for soups, stews and noodle soups.

Yields: 16 cups

Check out some yummy soups to make using this Pork Stock: Spinach and Shrimp Balls Soup (Canh Rau Spinach voi Tom Vien) and Won Ton Noodle Soup (Mi Hoanh Thanh).

Tools I Love and Use in My Kitchen

Simmering Pork Stock - Look how clear the liquid is!

Homemade Pork Stock - flavorful and delicious!

Must-know recipe for making clear and delicious Pork Stock
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Pork Stock (Nuoc Leo)

Course: Soup
Cuisine: Asian, Vietnamese
Prep Time: 25 minutes
Cook Time: 2 hours 45 minutes
Total Time: 3 hours 10 minutes
Servings: 16 cups
Calories: 25 kcal
Author: Trang

Aromatic and flavorful Pork Stock can be made easily at home with this recipe. Having a clear golden liquid and rich full-bodied flavor are crucial success factors when making homemade stock. In addition to using good, fresh ingredients, the keys to a beautiful and tasty Pork Stock are the preparation and cooking methods. In this easy recipe, I share my tried-and-true method for making homemade Pork Stock. This recipe makes amazing stock every single time. Just one taste of this clean and healthy Pork Stock and you'll want to make it from scratch every time!

Ingredients

  • 2 inch knob ginger
  • 1 medium sweet onion
  • 5 lbs pork bones
  • 1/4 cup salt divided
  • 2 Tbsp white vinegar
  • 20 cups water
  • 1.5 oz rock sugar
  • 20 black peppercorns
  • 1/3 dried squid

Instructions

  1. Remove the skin from the ginger and discard. Using a pestle, smash the ginger slightly.
  2. Peel the onion skin and discard. Quarter the onion but don't cut it all the way through.
  3. Transfer half the pork bones into a large colander and then sprinkle with 1 Tbsp salt. Add the remaining bones and sprinkle with another 1 Tbsp salt.
  4. Gently rub the salt onto the bones. Under cold running water, wash each bone thoroughly. Run your fingers along each piece and wash away any loose bits. Transfer the washed bones into a large bowl. Sprinkle another 1 Tbsp salt and add the vinegar to the bones. Fill the bowl with cold water. Let the bones soak for 10 minutes. Pour out the soaking liquid and transfer the bones into the colander. Quickly rinse the bones with water again.
  5. Bring a large pot of water to a boil over High heat. Transfer all the bones into the pot. As the water comes to a boil again, skim off the foam and scum and discard. Rotate the bones. (This helps to move the scum to the surface.) Continue skimming away the impurities. Boil for a total of 5 minutes, alternating the stirring with the skimming.
  6. Pour off as much of the liquid as possible. Transfer the bones into the colander. Under cold running water, wash each bone thoroughly. Scrub with your fingers and remove any bits of marrow.

  7. In a large pot, add the 20 cups water. Cover with a lid and bring to a boil over High heat. Transfer the cleaned bones into the water. Add the onion, ginger, rock sugar, peppercorns and remaining 1 Tbsp salt. As the liquid comes to a boil, rotate the bones and skim off any scum. Reduce the heat to Low. Partially cover the pot with a lid. Simmer for 30 minutes. Stir the bones and skim the top again. Let simmer for another 30 minutes.
  8. Cut off a small section of the squid body. Wash with warm water and then shake off the excess water. Place into a small oven and bake at 350 F (177 C) for 8 minutes. Add the squid into the pot. Wedge it under one of the bones to keep it submerged in the stock. Continue cooking on Low heat for another hour.
  9. Skim the stock one more time. Remove the vegetables, squid and all the bones. Season the stock with more salt if needed.
  10. Strain the stock using a fine strainer or sieve.
  11. If not using right away, store in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. Freeze for up to 6 months.
  12. Enjoy the Pork Stock as a simple soup or as a base for soups, stews and noodle soups.

Notes, Tips & Tricks

  • Either fresh or frozen pork bones can be used for this recipe. Make sure the bones are completely thawed before using. At my local Asian grocer, pork bones are sold at the meat counter and I can purchase any quantity needed. Some stores will pre-package the bones and sell them with other refrigerated pork products while others stock them in the freezer section.
  • Salt and vinegar are awesome natural cleaning agents. Salt is a natural abrasive and soap, washing away greasiness. Vinegar is a really effective deodorizer. I use these two ingredients to clean all my meats and fish.
  • I am using an 8 quart pot which is just large enough to hold everything. If you'd like to make more stock, use a larger pot, perhaps a 10 or 12 quart pot.
  • Dried squid can be found at your local Asian grocery store. It's usually stocked in the refrigerated section.
  • The squid adds a unique combination of savory and sweetness to the stock. I don't use any more than one-third of a squid body. Too much squid can overpower the stock. This is why I add it at the simmering halfway point rather than at the beginning. If you can smell the squid in the stock, there's too much of it.
  • Do not cover the pot completely when simmering the stock. This will cause the stock to be cloudy.
  • The pork stock yield may vary depending on the bones used. Note the bones I used had a significant amount of meat on them. This meat absorbs a lot of liquid in addition to some evaporating during the simmer process. If needing a greater yield, add more water. Also, when removing the bones, shake off each piece to leave behind as much stock as possible.
  • You may have noticed I didn't add fish sauce to the base stock. I save this additional seasoning for the final dish. Most of the time the stock is used to make other dishes and that's when I add fish sauce. Also, I've found stock with fish sauce turns slightly sour after refrigerating or freezing.

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2 Responses to Pork Stock (Nuoc Leo)

  1. Jill March 24, 2017 at 2:45 am #

    I love the new recipe cards!!! Thank you!

    • Trang March 29, 2017 at 7:46 pm #

      You’re welcome Jill. I am so glad to hear that! 🙂

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